Monday, June 30, 2014

Indonesia Plots Master Plan for Aquaculture Development - The Fish Site

Indonesia Plots Master Plan for Aquaculture Development - The Fish Site: "Because aquaculture production supplies about 45 per cent of fishery products consumed worldwide and the rapid global demand for fishery products continues to grow, while the supply through traditional sources is stagnant, the Indonesian government said it is continuing in its efforts to promote the sustainability of the supply and demand of fishery products in the future through the development of environmentally friendly and sustainable cultivation technology.
Secretary General of the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Sjarief Widjaja speaking in Jakarta, said that in addition to the technology development, the government is inviting stakeholders to participate actively in fishing and collaborate to construct a fisheries policy that contribute to build a secure supply of fishery products in a sustainable manner.
"Therefore, the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries has called on WorldFish, an international non-profit organization in Asia, to put together a master plan for national aquaculture by 2020, through the Future Indonesian Aquaculture research projects that will be implemented over 18 months", said Sjarief."



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Thursday, June 19, 2014

Aquaculture - National Geographic

Aquaculture - National Geographic: "How to Farm a Better Fish

In a dark, dank warehouse in the Blue Ridge foothills of Virginia, Bill Martin picks up a bucket of brown pellets and slings them into a long concrete tank. Fat, white tilapia the size of dinner plates boil to the surface. Martin, president of Blue Ridge Aquaculture, one of the world’s largest indoor fish farms, smiles at the feeding frenzy.

BY JOEL K. BOURNE, JR.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRIAN SKERRY"



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How fish farms around the world are caring for the ocean | Mail Online

How fish farms around the world are caring for the ocean | Mail Online: "Survival of the fishiest: From giant Japanese scallop nets to domed shrimp cages, how marine farms around the world are caring for the ocean
Giant natural water filter off Vancouver Island, Canada, devised to help reduce pollution on fish farms
In gulf of California, unconventional shrimp cages reduce disease
World fisheries produced 158million tonnes in 2012, of which almost 70million came from aquaculture"



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Wednesday, June 18, 2014

8 maps that will change the way you look at Africa | ONE.org

8 maps that will change the way you look at Africa | ONE.org: "8 maps that will change the way you look at Africa

You already know that Africa isn’t a country. But what else? Check out these maps and put the continent’s population, income, growth, and potential into context.





 1. Where the world’s 7 billion live


National Geographic‘s map illustrates where and how the world lives. Not surprisingly, the areas with the highest income levels have greater life expectancy (77 for males, 83 for females compared to 58 and 60 in low income levels), access to improved sanitation (99 percent compared to 35 percent), among other human security factors. The need for development is critical in sub-Saharan Africa, where nearly 1 billion people live, many on $995 or less a year."



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12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty’s biggest challenges | ONE.org

12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty’s biggest challenges | ONE.org: "12 Data visualizations that illustrate poverty’s biggest challenges

Here’s a collection of some of the best data visualizations on global literacy, mortality, birth rates and more that will help put some of the biggest issues surrounding poverty today into perspective. The good news: Extreme poverty is declining, and life expectancy and incomes on the whole are on the up and up. The bad news: We still have a lot of work to do!"



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Living Costs of just $1,000 a Month in Penang, Malaysia

Living Costs of just $1,000 a Month in Penang, Malaysia:



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Tuesday, June 17, 2014

A Call to Prioritize Gender in Development | Patrick Fine

A Call to Prioritize Gender in Development | Patrick Fine: "Gender is not just about women and girls. Understanding gender means understanding the differences, in particular the economic, social, political and cultural attributes, constraints and opportunities that are associated with being female and male, and in some places, a third (or other) gender. It also means understanding how the social and economic forces unleashed by modernization (and abetted by development programs) affect women, men, boys and girls and the interactive relationship among them."



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A Call to Prioritize Gender in Development | Patrick Fine

A Call to Prioritize Gender in Development | Patrick Fine: "Gender is not just about women and girls. Understanding gender means understanding the differences, in particular the economic, social, political and cultural attributes, constraints and opportunities that are associated with being female and male, and in some places, a third (or other) gender. It also means understanding how the social and economic forces unleashed by modernization (and abetted by development programs) affect women, men, boys and girls and the interactive relationship among them."



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A Call to Prioritize Gender in Development | Patrick Fine

A Call to Prioritize Gender in Development | Patrick Fine: "Gender is not just about women and girls. Understanding gender means understanding the differences, in particular the economic, social, political and cultural attributes, constraints and opportunities that are associated with being female and male, and in some places, a third (or other) gender. It also means understanding how the social and economic forces unleashed by modernization (and abetted by development programs) affect women, men, boys and girls and the interactive relationship among them."



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